Centaurs aan de bosrand: Burckhardt en Tolstoj // [Centaurs at the edge of the wood: Burckhardt and Tolstoj]

Abstract
Compares the attitudes of Jakob Burckhardt and Leo Tolstoy to history and historiography, with special reference to Tolstoy's 'War and Peace' (1865) and Burckhardt's lecture cycle 'Über das Studium der Geschichte' (1868-73). The author examines their respective techniques (narration versus the choice of representative examples), the use of facts as a means of expression, the blend of objective facts and subjective ideas which Burckhardt took pains to avoid, both his and Tolstoy's conviction that the writing of history was in decline, and the similarities between them in their attitude toward the relationship between philosophy and history, illustrated by Burckhardt's image of the centaur as a mentor who combines the qualities of philosopher and historian.